Lampard Reveals How He Will Solve Arguments Between Teammates

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It’s usually normal to see teammates argue on the playing pitch, and more recently Liverpool stars Mohamed Salah and his team-mate Sadio Mane were involved in an altercation at Burnley when one did not pass to the other.

Ahead of Chelsea’s clash with Liverpool on Sunday, Lampard has spoken about players’ arguments and how he saw it even as a player, as he insisted that these things are only normal.

“They are both in the right,” Lampard said of who behaved correctly among the Liverpool pair.

“They are competitive lads. I played with players who demanded the ball to their feet when I shot and vice versa, I demanded they passed to me when they shot. That edginess about football, that professional competition amongst the group is good as long as it does not overstep the mark, and that is probably the job of the manager.

“They both want to score goals, they are hungry, they are competitive, they want to be winners and when they play like they do, that is the answer. If they are not playing well enough and not performing, and you see that kind of thing going on then the manager would maybe ask many more questions, but these boys are really driven and I like it.”

Lampard then looked back at his playing career and remembered an altercation he had with former Blue Jimmy Floyd Hasselbaink.

Lampard went on: “I remember being in the dressing room with him after I scored at Southampton and he complained that I had not passed to him in the game and I should have passed to him at a different moment from when I scored my goal. He was saying you scored one, you are just trying to score another one and not pass to me – and this from the man who shot 20 times a game!

“But that was Jimmy and it is what football is about. It is different personalities, and strikers have to have an element of selfishness about them. I had it as a midfield player, I wanted to be good individually and I wanted to be part of a winning team, and you can’t have a perfect ambience around a team all the time. It is good for players to test each other.

“Jimmy probably ignored me for a couple of days and we probably spoke again after that,’ our manager tries to recall. ‘There was no big issue but I remember it and as you get older you respect him for it, and that made Jimmy the force he was at the time too.”

About the Author

VICTOR N
Chelsea is more than just a football club to me; it's a passion I share, and my affinity with the Chelsea badge is one that will last forever. As far as watching my favourite team is concerned, I'd rather miss a meal than miss a Chelsea game.